Paper Girls, vol.2 by Brian K. Vaughan

Read: 16 May, 2017

I’d love to start this review with a plot summary, but I’m still trying to figure it out for myself.

The story isn’t making much more sense, but the weirdness is starting to become familiar.

As are the characters. I had a little trouble in the first volume because everything was happening so fast that I never got a real grasp on the characters. But they’re starting to differentiate for me, and I’m getting a better sense of who they are.

The artwork is great, and the story is certainly compelling (if rather confusing).

But now I have the same problem I had with Saga – I have to wait several months before the next instalment comes out.

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Lumberjanes #3-4: A Terrible Plan & Out of Time by Noelle Stevenson & Shannon Watters

Read: 23 April, 2017

The first two volumes meandered toward a single plotline that was resolved. In these two, we get a few different mini plots that hint at the big mystery of the Camp for Hardcore Lady-Types.

These stories are satisfying on their own, and only some involve defeating big scary monsters (the first story in A Terrible Plan is simply the girls telling scary stories while sitting around a campfire), with no need for any big-p Plot. That said, though, we do get some more information on the camp, and on the mysterious Bear Woman.

Mostly, though, the story is about the friendships, and that’s where it delivers. I also love the inclusion of various sexualities and gender identities.

The art style fits the tone of the series perfectly – it’s cartoony, fairly expressive, whimsical. It’s not photorealistic, sometimes it’s even a bit first draft-y, but it always fits the mood of the panel well.

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Ms Marvel, vol. 3-4: Crushed & Last Days by G. Willow Wilson

Read: 20 April, 2017

In Crushed, Kamala meets a super cool guy who seems to totally get her until, of course, he turns out to be terrible. It’s a bit of an overdone plot, and the comic format makes it feel a bit rushed, but it works fine. Even though we never get a grasp on Kamran’s character (and his sudden change in behaviour is disturbing), it’s still nice to see how Kamala reacts to what’s going on.

Then some big plot stuff gets set up and then… Last Days. The world ends.

According to Wikipedia, it was some big Marvel “event”? I guess I don’t really understand. It was nice to see how Kamala deals with the end of the world, but it seems like she had such a short run. And it’s hard to see how the series can recover from… everyone dying? The only alternative is that it’s was a fake-out and Kamala isn’t dead, despite all the resolutions, and that’s not a whole lot better.

And I guess this is my issue with the superhero/extended universe stuff in general – I can’t possibly keep up with everything, but I feel like I’m missing half the story when I read just the ones I like. It’s hard not to be put off.

I do like Kamala, though, and I like the nerdy references (“KHAAAAAAAN!”), and I like how she relates to her friends and her family. I just can’t help but think that her story would have been much more interesting without the confusion of all these different superheroes around (when she gets her powers, one of the first things they do is try to figure out which origin story she fits – is she a mutant? is she created? no, she’s an “inhuman”/part alien whose powers were activated by chemicals…. okay…). And while I can appreciate the part of her character that geeks out over meeting other superheroes, I feel like there’s a better story to be found if she simply used stories of fictional superheroes to build an identity for herself. Imagine if Captain Marvel were a fictional character whose persona Kamala adopted…

Anyways, I’m sure this comes down to personal taste. Readers who are more invested in the Marvel brand probably get a lot more out of the crossovers and extended universe “events”.

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Trickster, edited by Matt Dembicki

Read: 11 April, 2017

This is a fair collection of trickster stories, each told by a different storyteller/artist team. Given the anthological nature of the book, the quality does vary quite a bit, though only one or two of the stories were what I would consider poor. For the most part, they were interesting, well told, and well illustrated.

As each story is illustrated by a different artist, each has its own style – and these can vary quite a bit, from Marvel-like to Ren and Stimpy. For the most part, I found that the art style meshed fairly well with the tone of the story.

From what I’ve read, these stories are somewhat sanitized. There’s nothing in here that your average parents wouldn’t want their kids – even fairly young kids – reading. There’s nothing approaching the crueller/raunchier trickster tales I’ve come across. I assume that this was deliberate to keep the collection fairly universal, but it may give an overly clean impression to readers who – like the editor – weren’t familiar with First Nations stories prior to encountering this volume.

I was fairly impressed by the geographical breadth of the anthology. There is even a Hawaiian story, which I don’t often see in collections of North American First Nations stories.

Overall, I found that the quality does vary quite a bit from story to story, but the collection is worth checking out.

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Paper Girls, vol. 1 by Brian K. Vaughan

Read: 7 April, 2017

This was recommended to me as “if you like Stranger Things…” And I can see the comparison. It’s set in the ’80s, it’s about a group of young kids (in this case, 12 year old girls) who come upon some sort of mysterious monster shenanigans.

The storytelling is very good, with a strong sense of pacing. It makes the setting details clear (such as the date) without explicitly spelling them out. As for the mystery, it makes just enough sense to keep me from feeling lost, while still remaining mysterious enough to be compelling.

The main characters seem solid and are interesting as a group, but I’m having a little trouble getting a sense of them each as individuals. I’m assuming that this is a space issue and that we’ll get to know them better as the series wears on.

The artwork is great. It’s very expressive and stays stylistically consistent even while it increases or decreases detail depending on the needs of the panel.

Overall, I quite liked the first volume of Paper Girls, and I’m intrigued enough to continue the series. Of course, there’s still 30 people ahead of me on the library waiting list for volume 2…

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Lumberjanes #1-2: Beware the Kitten Holy & Friendship to the Max by Noelle Stevenson & Grace Ellis

Read: April 7, 2017

This is the high energy story of the young women of cabin Roanoke, who follow a bearwoman into the woods and are attacked by three-eyed foxes, and things only get stranger from there.

There’s very little downtime in Lumberjanes. Monsters fly out from every direction, the characters are constantly active, there’s loads of yelling… The downside to this is that the mystery never really gets time to build, there’s no pause to wonder what might be happening. It’s just action, action, action, reveal. It’s not my favourite pace, but it works.

The artwork is somewhat unrefined, but it fits the tone of the story and has a certain character to it.

Essentially, Lumberjanes is what it is, and it is that well. The reveal – which I won’t spoil – was a bit of a let down, only because I’ve seen it too often, but all the elements of the story worked.

This would be fantastic as a “baby’s first graphic novel”, for ages 7-10.

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Ms Marvel, vol. 1-2: No Normal & Generation Why by G. Willow Wilson

Read: 2 April, 2017

Kamala Khan is a fairly ordinary nerdy Pakistani-USian until her latent “bendy” powers are suddenly triggered in some sort of attack. Now, she can make herself huge (embiggen), or small (disembiggen), or even make herself look like someone else. Will she learn how to control her powers? What will she do with them?

This is your fairly standard hero origin story, made interesting by Kamala. As a third culture kid, she has to forge her own, unique identity out of the fragments she’s given. This actually meshes surprisingly well with the ‘secret identity’ hero story.

Wilson’s writing is solid. Characters felt consistent, and were well developed. There’s some reliance on stereotypes, but that’s normal in the first impressions stage. I fully expect everyone to get more fleshed out as the series wears on (and, certainly, that process is already evident in how Kamala’s parents are treated just in these two volumes).

The artwork is fine. It’s clear, it works. I did find that it lacks a bit in personality, and there’s a jarring difference in character appearance between the first volume and the beginning of the second. Still, I’m mainly being nit-picky.

Overall, I enjoyed the first volume quite a bit – which is surprising with my terrible case of origin story fatigue – but wasn’t quite as impressed with the second. Generation Why tackles some pretty big themes, including cults, environmental destruction, and “kids today”, but it doesn’t really handle them with nearly enough care. This isn’t really a spoiler since it’s set up in volume one, but Kamala discovers that a bunch of missing kids are in a cult. When Kamala tries to free them, they resist, explaining that they are all there by choice and giving a pretty shallow explanation of why. Kamala meets their protestations with an equally shallow rebuttal, and they all immediately switch sides.

Yikes.

I can’t tell whether Wilson really just doesn’t know about cults and couldn’t be bothered to look the topic up before she started writing, or she was just too pressed for time, but the result is pretty terrible. I hope that we get to see some of those characters return in future volumes and see more of the psychological aftermath of being in a cult, but even if that’s the case, there was some serious damage done by trying to cram too many themes into such a short space.

I do enjoy Kamala, though, and I look forward to reading more of her adventures. If you are into the Marvel universe, this is a great addition. If not, some aspects get a little silly (random aliens! bird people! gas attacks on a city are no big deal!), but they don’t get in the way of the core “third culture kid forges an identity for herself” theme of the series.

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Monstress, Vol. 1: Awakening by Marjorie M. Liu (illustrated by Sana Takeda)

Read: 27 December, 2016

The summary describes the setting as “an alternate matriarchal 1900’s Asia.” Which… is better than any description I could come up with. Very little gets explained in this first volume.

Which is my main issue. While it could be argued that the storytelling dives right in without wasting a bunch of time on exposition, this left me with very little to latch on to. Things happened, characters acted, but I was just left feeling somewhat confused. I didn’t quite know what to make of them or what I was supposed to be feeling. I don’t need an infodump, but a little more context would have been nice. By the time I finally started feeling like I had a grasp on the world, the volume was over.

A lot of that is, I’m sure, in the nature of the serial storytelling common with comics. This is where I like graphic novels so much more – the story I pick up is complete, it has its arc, I don’t have to keep going through issues on blind faith that I will, at some point, figure out what the heck is going on.

But this is genre convention, so I supposed it isn’t really fair to judge Monstress for adhering to it. People who are more comfortable with serial comics will be fine, whereas people coming from a prose background, like myself, will likely struggle. Be warned.

The plot itself didn’t have much room to develop in such a short volume. It’s a fairly standard “ancient ones vs humans and oh yes the in between people”, with the twist that people can absorb an element from the ancient ones (and their mixed offspring) to gain power. It’s nothing I haven’t seen before.

The matriarchy angle is interesting. There’s a particular joy to reading a comic where nearly all the characters are female, except for a handful of background characters who have very little dialogue. After so much media being the opposite, it was refreshing.

But it felt like it just wasn’t going quite far enough. It’s a matriarchy, but soldiers wear armour that accentuates their sexy at the expense of protection (boob armour! boob armour everywhere!). And while there are a few larger bodies, they are in the background. All the central adult characters are super models. It would have been nice to have a little more variety.

That said, the main character is an amputee, and that is just wonderful to see.

Where the series really sells itself is in the artwork. It’s sort of art nouveau inspired, and it is so gorgeous. Every single panel is rich with detail. From what I can judge of the first volume, it’s the artwork where this series is distinguishing itself. It’s the artwork that’s going to make people giving volume 2 a chance.

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Star Wars: Shattered Empire by Greg Rucka and illustrated by Marco Checchetto, Angel Unzueta, and Emilio Laiso

Read: 27 October, 2016

Taking place in the aftermath of Return of the Jedi, this graphic novel features Shara Bey, mother of Force Awaken‘s Poe Dameron, as she meets a number of the Star Wars universe’s big names.

I really can’t say that I loved Shattered Empire. The dialogue writing was passable, but not great. The artwork was fine, albeit a little showy, and lacked character. The plot writing was unfocused.

The artwork felt a little too polished, and it bordered on the uncanny valley with the characters from the movies – trying too hard to make them recognisable. In some portions, it actually looked like the scenes were made with 3D models and then sketched over. There’s a certain stiffness, an inorganic Barbie doll-ness, to that art style that kept popping up. I also found that the action sequences lacked clarity, so that I had to skip ahead to figure out what I was supposed to be seeing.

For the plot, each section of the book has Bey going off on a different adventure, each time with a different original cast member from the movies. The adventures themselves are interesting enough, but nothing ties them together, they don’t build toward anything.

My last complaint – and this is with the Star Wars universe more broadly – is with the focus on parentage. I would have enjoyed Shara Bey just fine as a character without her being the parent of another character. I could have enjoyed Poe Dameron just fine as a character without finding out that his parents were important people who got to meet Luke and Leia.

The parentage theme works with Anakin and Luke because that’s the story, “the sins of the father” and so forth. But there’s no reason to take it any further than that. We don’t need to find out that Anakin is actually the one who built C3PO, or that fan favourite Boba Fett’s father was actually the genetic pattern used for the clone army, or whatever is going on with Rey. These characters are all lovely and important on their own, without the need for intricate breeding certifications.

What I loved about this book, and about the expanding universe in general, is how diverse they make the universe feel. And by retconning women and POCs back into the events of the original trilogy, they let me feel, for the first time, like characters who look like me can really matter in this epic story. I’ve always loved Star Wars, but the new canon is the first time I’ve ever felt loved back by the franchise.

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The Rabbi’s Cat by Joann Sfar

Read: 23 October, 2016

The Rabbi’s Cat is a slow, meandering snapshot of life in an Algerian rabbi’s household, as narrated by his pet cat. The cat begins to speak, and so the rabbi must prepare him for his bar mitzvah. The family gets a visit from cousin Malka and his pet lion. The rabbi must pass a dictation test to determine his rabbinical placement. The rabbi’s daughter marries, and the whole household goes to Paris to meet her new in-laws. Things happen, the characters talk and feel and live, and issues are resolved after a fashion, enough to make way for the next. I wouldn’t be surprised if each chapter had originally been published serially.

I picked this book out at the library, knowing absolutely nothing about it, because the cover looked interesting. Unlike the last time I did this, this time was actually a very pleasant surprise.

The artwork is beautiful. It has a lot of character, and it shifts with mood to enhance the storytelling. As I’ve been trying to read some more superhero comics, which tend to favour a more “realistic” style (albeit with idealised bodies), this kind of expressive artwork has been missing.

I also found that the style reminded me a lot of the French comic books that I used to read as a child. I felt very vindicated when I found out that the artist does, in fact, belong to the French graphic novel tradition!

The story itself is delightful. Most of the characters are fairly archetypal, but we spend a lot of time getting into the rabbi’s head. He’s a complicated person who is seen wrestling with his faith. In the beginning, it’s more intellectual, as he tries to teach the cat in preparation for his bar mitzvah and they argue theology. Later, when his daughter marries and he feels abandoned, it brings his grief over his deceased wife back to the forefront. It’s very touching, often funny, and so very human.

The novel had a somewhat mythic feel to it, particularly where the animals were involved. It read a bit like a parable, making its Jewishness all the more palpable.

I really enjoyed this one. It was cute, and heartwarming, and entertaining. The cat was amusing, and the storytelling was very well adapted to its medium.

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