Shaman’s Daughter by Nan Salerno & Rosamond Vanderburgh

Read: 10 September, 2012

I’ve always had a soft spot for stories about First Nations people, though there’s a very thin line between respect for the cultures and an idolization that sublimates the humanity of the cultures. Shaman’s Daughter, a collaboration between an anthropologist and a professor of literature, manages to present a suitably real picture of life at the turn of the last century.

The story follows Supaya (called Sophie by the whites) as she grows into adulthood, raises a family, and grows old. Through her life, we get to see the friction between the Church and the practitioners of the traditional faith and healing, the loss of identity of the residential schools and, later, the struggle to integrate and earn a living as an Indian, and the impact of World Wars 1&2 on the First Nations people.

The historical span is broad enough to show the changes as they were happening and, to some extent, their resolution.

The writing is also quite decent, and the book kept me engaged from start to finish.

Buy Shaman’s Daughter from Amazon to support this blog!

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *