The Six Directions of Space by Alastair Reynolds

Read: 17 November, 2018

When I picked this book up from the library, I was surprised by how small it was – coming in at only 85 pages. Given the scope of the book, it’s no surprise that it doesn’t really spend enough time with any one part: The characters are interesting at a glimpse, but we don’t get much depth; the worldbuilding is interesting, but we don’t get much of it; the multiverse concept is interesting, but we see very little of it.

I wanted so much more from the worldbuilding, because, I mean, Mongols in SPAAAAAACE! But this spacefaring civilization, that doesn’t have much in the way of planetary terraforming and therefore mostly lives on stations and in domes, has ponies. Why? Because the Mongols had ponies. There was an opportunity to do something neat with Mongols adapting from a pony-based nomadic society into a ship-based one, but instead they cart literal horses around on ships. Beyond that, because of the nature of the main character’s work, we get very little on what daily life would be like for the average denizen of this civilisation, despite that being the most interesting part of the story.

The discovery of a multiverse is interesting, but it’s been done. The idea of alternate histories being formed around singular events gone differently is interesting, but that’s been done too. Without something more, this reads more like an outline or a pitch than a completed story. A story – both what we actually see covered in this book, plus its implied continuation – that could easily be a whole series. Instead of that, we get 85 pages. It just barely whets the appetite, then pulls the meal away at the last second. I’m greedy, and I want more.