Vorkosigan Saga #19: Diplomatic Immunity by Lois McMaster Bujold

Read: 11 November, 2018

Over the course of the Vorkosigan series, there have been quite a number of details (people, places, ethnic groups..) that have popped up and then disappeared as attention moved elsewhere. The Nexus is big, and Miles always has to keep moving. I could read a whole series devoted entirely to Cetaganda, for example, but I also want Miles to explore Jackson Whole. Invariably, each individual story gives the reader only as much of the characters and setting as is necessary for that particular story, and then we – and Miles – move on.

But, sometimes, we get to another encounter, a little follow up. Diplomatic Immunity has that in heaps.

For one thing, I loved the Quaddies in Falling Free, when they were just a little group of hopefuls heading out into the cold universe to try to make a little home for themselves. We did get to see one Quaddie, Nicol, briefly in “Labyrinth”, but she was out of her element and under stress and, anyway, we didn’t get to spend a whole lot of time with her. Now, however, we get a whole story set in Quaddie-space!

It was fantastic to see how the ideals of the original community translated into an organic culture with history behind it. It was also lovely to see the Quaddies with more agency and power (as they were treated in a very child-like way by the downsider characters in Falling Free), while still retaining that essential communal nature that had made them so unique.

I was also so happy to see Bel Thorne again. I’m so glad that it landed on its feet (so to speak) after everything that went down, and I’m really happy that it was able to find Nicol again.

I did notice some growth in how Bel’s gender is treated. For one thing, Miles seems to have retconned some mutuality into their sexual chemistry, and seems to regret that they hadn’t had a relationship when it was possible. Perhaps that’s just a sign of Miles’s own growth and maturity. I noticed, also, the term “herm” being used quite a bit, which I think is new? I don’t recall it leaping out at me previously, though of course Bel wasn’t the focal point of a story until now.

I would have happily read a book about Guppy’s life, and his time with Gras-Grace and the others. I wish we’d had a little more closure with regards to his fate, because he deserved so much more than what happened to him in this story.

Lastly, babies! Twins! Oh my goodness, I’m so excited!

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Vorkosigan Saga #2: Falling Free by Lois McMaster Bujold

Read: 28 August, 2017

I am so grateful to the people who finally convinced me to give Bujold a read. Her short stories were fun, but Mountains of Mourning shook me rather deeply. And here, we have a full novel with that same intense emotional impact.

Right from the beginning, I fell in love with the Quaddies. Well, with Claire and Silver, anyway. Claire is a bit of a goodie-goodie, but I really connected with her through her interactions with Andy. And Silver… well, Silver is just wonderful.

And then Bujold started putting these two wonderful women through hell. Page after page, I had to read through a cringe as some of the worst things I can imagine happen to them. I’m fairly desensitised to violence, I don’t feel it when characters are shot, or hit, or fall. I just see it too often in media, and it doesn’t really mean much. But the things Bujold put these two poor characters through really twisted my stomach.

Leo Graf was a bit bland as a protagonist, but he worked well enough as a reader-insert. He struck that good balance between being the outsider through which the reader can experience the story, and being an active agent within the story. Even so, I liked that Bujold didn’t fall too deep in the “white guy saviour of the child-like natives” trope, despite how very strong the temptation clearly was.

Van Atta was a great moustache-twirling baddie. He made me squirm. Worse, I’ve known people like him, and Bujold wrote him perfectly to set off all my warning bells. I can understand complaints that he was fairly one-dimensional, and it’s true that he really was just irredeemably awful, but it worked. And even without complexity, he still rang very true – making him all the more frightening.

My only complaint about the book was the love story. It felt tacked on, and it really wasn’t necessary. I feel like the story, as well as the two characters involved, would have been quite a bit stronger if they could have just been friends. I would like to see a man and a woman work together to achieve a goal, suffer together, trust each other, respect each other, and not have to be lovers by the end. It’s just overdone.

But that was a very small part of the book. The rest was fantastic. And reading all these reviews declaring this book one of the weaker books in the Vorkosigan Saga is making me so very excited to read on!

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