Ms Marvel, vol. 1-2: No Normal & Generation Why by G. Willow Wilson

Read: 2 April, 2017

Kamala Khan is a fairly ordinary nerdy Pakistani-USian until her latent “bendy” powers are suddenly triggered in some sort of attack. Now, she can make herself huge (embiggen), or small (disembiggen), or even make herself look like someone else. Will she learn how to control her powers? What will she do with them?

This is your fairly standard hero origin story, made interesting by Kamala. As a third culture kid, she has to forge her own, unique identity out of the fragments she’s given. This actually meshes surprisingly well with the ‘secret identity’ hero story.

Wilson’s writing is solid. Characters felt consistent, and were well developed. There’s some reliance on stereotypes, but that’s normal in the first impressions stage. I fully expect everyone to get more fleshed out as the series wears on (and, certainly, that process is already evident in how Kamala’s parents are treated just in these two volumes).

The artwork is fine. It’s clear, it works. I did find that it lacks a bit in personality, and there’s a jarring difference in character appearance between the first volume and the beginning of the second. Still, I’m mainly being nit-picky.

Overall, I enjoyed the first volume quite a bit – which is surprising with my terrible case of origin story fatigue – but wasn’t quite as impressed with the second. Generation Why tackles some pretty big themes, including cults, environmental destruction, and “kids today”, but it doesn’t really handle them with nearly enough care. This isn’t really a spoiler since it’s set up in volume one, but Kamala discovers that a bunch of missing kids are in a cult. When Kamala tries to free them, they resist, explaining that they are all there by choice and giving a pretty shallow explanation of why. Kamala meets their protestations with an equally shallow rebuttal, and they all immediately switch sides.

Yikes.

I can’t tell whether Wilson really just doesn’t know about cults and couldn’t be bothered to look the topic up before she started writing, or she was just too pressed for time, but the result is pretty terrible. I hope that we get to see some of those characters return in future volumes and see more of the psychological aftermath of being in a cult, but even if that’s the case, there was some serious damage done by trying to cram too many themes into such a short space.

I do enjoy Kamala, though, and I look forward to reading more of her adventures. If you are into the Marvel universe, this is a great addition. If not, some aspects get a little silly (random aliens! bird people! gas attacks on a city are no big deal!), but they don’t get in the way of the core “third culture kid forges an identity for herself” theme of the series.

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