Kim & Kim, vol. 1: “This Glamorous, High-Flying Rock Star Life” by Magdalene Visaggio, illustrated by Eva Cabrera

Read: 3 September, 2018

I’ve never read the Tank Girl comics, but I’ve always loved the movie (shut up, it’s awesome). I loved the sheer punk-ness of it – the over-the-top sass, the stuff that makes no sense but gets thrown in just because it’s cool, the colours, the joy of it.

Kim & Kim has that same energy. The Fighting Kims live in a grounded, real world (one Kim is humiliated by having to beg her parents to pay her rent when she fails yet again, while the other Kim is consistently misgendered by her father), yet they live big and loud. They are colourful, they love what they do, they are cartoonishly vibrant. It’s just a joy to read.

The story was okay. It bounced around a bit, and I was always feeling like I’d accidentally missed a page (the time jumping and narration really didn’t help). It felt a bit like just an excuse to show off these characters.

But the characters are fantastic, and the art style does them justice. While there are some printing issues (some of the panels look a little out of focus), I loved how expressive and colourful and cool the art is.

A Queer and Pleasant Danger by Kate Bornstein

Read: 30 June, 2017

As the front cover puts it, this is “the true story of a nice Jewish boy who joins the Church of Scientology and leaves twelve years later to become the lovely lady she is today.” Phew, talk about a rollercoaster!

There’s a lot in this book to offend. While Bornstein seems to have loved her time as a Scientologist, her criticisms of the Church are biting. She talks casually, even somewhat positively, of her eating disorder and her self-harm, of her smoking and binge drinking. She discusses seeing herself as a “transsexual” rather than a woman, and her disagreement with the idea that trans women belong in women-only spaces. She describes, in a fair bit of detail, her sexual conquests as a man, and her submission in an S&M relationship. There’s something in this book to offend nearly anyone.

But Bornstein’s writing style is so warm, so friendly… it’s hard to stay mad. Even when she’s at her hot messiest, she just seems so vulnerable and trusting that it’s difficult not “agree to disagree”.

Hers is a valuable and thoughtful voice, and I’m glad to have stumbled upon this book.

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